Blue Carts & Barbed Wired
2018
Textiles, embroidery, digital image on vinyl banner
4ft x 6ft

Featured: “New York to New Mexico: New Acquisitions,” which opens on February 6, 2021, highlights new acquisitions of American and Native American art entered into the collection since 2017 — thanks to generous donations and purchases.


One work in the show is “Blue Carts & Barbed Wired” by Woolpunk.


Woolpunk is an American artist, born in Summit, NJ in 1971. Inspired by an immigrant seamstress grandmother who sewed American flags for a living, Woolpunk machine knits fiber installations, quilts sculptures, and embroiders photographs to influence social change.


“Blue Carts & Barbed Wired” is a digital photograph printed on a vinyl banner with a variety of appliqued textiles and colorful needlework. Woolpunk’s photographic image represents urban sprawl, questions land use, and illustrates the commodification of Jersey City which is now at the zenith of gentrification. Abandoned and dilapidated lots are being purchased by the highest bidder directly under billboards stating “Jersey City Make It Yours.”


Using the vinyl banner as cross-stitch fabric, Woolpunk quilts and embroiders colors, patterns, and textiles to beautify the neglected landscape. This is her way of highlighting forgotten corners of a place she’s called home since the mid- nineties.


Woolpunk (b. 1971)

Blue Carts & Barbed Wired, 2018

Digital image on vinyl banner with needlework Gift of the artist

2019.9

Blue Carts & Barbed Wired
2018

Blue Carts & Barbed Wired is now part of the permanent collection of the Montclair Art Museum.

Blue Carts & Barbed Wired on view at the Montclair Art Museum
2019
Digital embroidered image with textiles on vinyl banner
4 x 6ft
Blue Carts & Barbed Wired
2019
Digital image with textiles on vinyl banner
Home Sweet Home, 2007
Installation view Novado Gallery, 2019
Textiles, needlework and digital image on vinyl banner
4 x 6ft
Democratic presidential candidate Corey Booker speaking in front of Home Sweet Home.
2019 at Novado Gallery
Fenced In_detail
2020
Cross Stitch on Digital Image
15 x 18in
Share the Road_detail
2020
Cross Stitch on Digital Image
15 x 18in
Can't Let It Go_detail
2020
Cross Stitch on Digital Image
15 x 18in
Styrofoam Lake_detail
2020
Cross Stitch on Digital Image
15 x 18in
Gentrified_detail
2020
Cross Stitch on Digital Image
15 x 18in
Burnt Out_detail
2020
Cross Stitch on Digital Image
15 x 18in
Installation at Art & Social Activism Festival
2019

Urban Weavings on view at Art & Social Activism Festival in October, 2019 at 32 Orchard Street, NYC.

Bergen Lafayette detail
2007
Digital embroidered photo on cross stitch fabric
18 x 15
Love Warehouse
2007
Digital embroidered photo on cross stitch fabric
18 x 15
Bergen Lafayette Detail
2007
Needlework and digital image on cross stitch fabric
18 x15
Grant Street Cleaners
2007
Needlework on digital image
18 x 15
My Foreclosed Neighborhood
2009
Photo transfer and needle work on Depression era style quilting at Walsh Gallery, Seton Hall University
approx. 3 ft x 5 ft

In 2008, two homes on either side of my newly purchased home were in foreclosure. After researching, I went onto foreclosure.com and found that 37 homes within one mile of my own home were in foreclosure, many due to predatory lending procedures. I narrowed down the list to 15 homes within 500 yards. I photographed the home, found the bank that purchased the property, transferred the photo of the property onto recycled textiles similar to depression era quilting and embellished with needlework.

My Foreclosed Neighborhood: US Bank Quilt Block
2008
Needlework and photo transfer on reclaimed fabric
11 x 15
My Foreclosed Neighborhood: RMS Properties Quilt Block
2008
Needlework and photo transfer on reclaimed fabric
11 x 15
My Foreclosed Neighborhood: Fannie Mae Quilt Block
2008
Needlework and photo transfer on reclaimed fabric
11 x 15
My Foreclosed Neighborhood: Deutsche Bank Quilt Block
2008
Needlework and photo transfer on reclaimed fabric
11 x 15